Report Shows Big Gaps in Newsroom Training

journalism training in newsrooms In some newsrooms, little training in the past year; in others, a lot. Nearly 9 in 10 journalists could absorb more, especially digital skills.

Even in the fast-changing digital age, a survey of 1,118 newspaper journalists conducted by The Poynter Institute with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation shows that training varies wildly between newsrooms. Overall, roughly two-thirds of the journalists surveyed they have received training in the past 12 months. The leading category of training was social media. A full 88 percent of the journalists surveyed said they are able to absorb more training. The most desired form of training? Social media, followed by digital tools and video skills.

[Read more…]

Social media viewed as a relevant part of journalistic research, study reveals

Poll Finds 89% Use Blogs, 65% Use Social Networking Sites, and 52% Use Microblogging Sites — but Reliability is a Major Concern

A national survey conducted by Cision and Don Bates of The George Washington University’s Master’s Degree Program in Strategic Public Relations found that an overwhelming majority of reporters and editors now depend on social media sources when researching their stories. Among the journalists surveyed, 89% said they turn to blogs for story research, 65% to social media sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn, and 52% to microblogging services such as Twitter. The survey also found that 61% use Wikipedia, the popular online encyclopedia.

[Read more…]